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Facades

Facades

UK 2 min 47 s

Tal Amiran is a London-based artist and musician. In 2006 he graduated from the Chelsea College of Art and has since been exhibiting internationally. His most recent screenings include Videocracy, International Video Art Festival in Hungary (2011), Asolo Art Film Festival in Italy (2011), the Pompidou Centre in Paris (2007) and the International Media Art Biennale in Poland (2007).

MONITOR
Blind Film

Blind Film

Netherlands 5 min 5 s

Ashiq Khondker is a self-proclaimed “sometimes artist”, having lived and worked between Philadelphia, New York and Amsterdam. He recently completed a Master’s Degree from the University of Amsterdam’s New Media Program. His work explores materiality and medium-specificity in their relation to narrative forms.

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Jan Villa

Jan Villa

India 20 min

Natasha Mendonca is a visual artist and filmmaker from Mumbai. In 2003 she co-founded Larzish, the nation’s first international film and video film festival on sexuality and gender in Bombay. Larzish’s success opened the floodgates for other Indian cities to hold their own queer film festivals. Jan Villa won the Tiger award at The International Film Festival Rotterdam (2011), the Ken Burns award for best film at the Ann Arbor Film Festival (2011) and an award at the International Contemporary Art Festival, SESC, VideoBrazil (2011). She is currently developing her first feature film.

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Isolation Of Pectoralis Major

Isolation Of Pectoralis Major

India 2 min 3 s

Kolkata based filmmaker Sukanya Ghosh is a trained painter and animator. She works with a direct animation technique and draws directly onto the frames of the moving image. This technique provides extreme elasticity of expression to invent, re-tell and create meaning through the use of textures and rhythms in the form of montage. Ghosh is the recipient of the Charles Wallace India Trust Award, the Independent Fellowship Award in New Delhi, and has been the artist-in-residence at the French Embassy in India.

MONITOR
Rear View Mirror

Rear View Mirror

Canada 12 min 50 s

Panchal Mansaram’s painting and film series titled Rear View Mirror are based on the writings of Marshall McLuhan, whom he has employed in his mixed-media art practice since the 1960s. Mansaram completed his studies at the State Academy of Fine Arts in Amsterdam in 1964. Subsequently, he moved to Toronto and has exhibited internationally. His work is housed in the collection of the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto and the National Gallery of Modern Art in New Delhi

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Silence Elsewhere

Silence Elsewhere

India 1 min 28 s

Tahireh Lal is a video-artist originally from Bangalore, and now completing her Masters of Fine Arts at Ontario College of Art & Design in Toronto. Her work explores the convergence of seemingly disparate ideas, in which naturally occurring systems, mathematics, mythologies and magic realism often influence the framework in which these ideas are synthesized.

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In_Transcience

In_Transcience

India 26 min 30 s

Ekta and Yashaswini are both Bangalore based filmmakers. Yashaswini has been working on award winning documentaries since she graduated in Social Communications Media, from Sophia Polytechnic in Mumbai. Ekta is the co-founder of Maraa, a media collective in Bangalore. She works in radio, theatre, research and filmmaking. She is interested in collecting stories, writing and conversations.

MONITOR
Echoed Moments in Time

Echoed Moments in Time

Bangladesh

Promotesh Das Pulak is a Bangladesh based artist. He received his MFA at the Institute of Fine Art, at the University of Dhaka in 2004. Since then he has exhibited internationally in Tokyo, Rome and most recently he as the youngest exhibitor at the Bangladeshi Pavilion at the Venice Biennale. He is a member of the Britto Arts Trust.

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Delta: My Lovely Tidings, A

Delta: My Lovely Tidings, A

Canada 5 min 53 s

Kitsum Cheng is an artist and writer. Born in Hong Kong, she currently lives in Vancouver. Her work has been presented at 221A Gallery, in Vancouver, Abeilung für Alles Andere, Berlin, Xchanges Gallery, Victoria and Third Space Gallery, St. John.

MONITOR

We shape our image and thereafter our image shapes us

2012 80 min

By Jacob Korczynski

“There is something to confess: your speaker likes to leave a movie theater. Back out on the more or less empty, more or less brightly lit sidewalk (it is invariably at night, and during the week, that he goes), and heading uncertainly for some café or other, he walks in silence (he doesn’t like discussing the film he’s just seen), a little dazed, wrapped up in himself…”

In his 1975 essay, Leaving the Movie Theater, Roland Barthes begins by placing his reader in a liminal space that is encountered by the author: exiting the architecture of a cinema, he moves us out to the architectural assemblage of the street which offers a multiplicity of available spaces that will further determine the body. Likewise, each screening is an assemblage. We form a temporary autonomous space, one that is composed of a social contract entered upon when we gather together within the architecture of the auditorium in the dark. The space of the cinema amplifies not only our location, but also what lies outside of it. For Monitor 8, what lies within the frame is the continuous reshaping of the contemporary South Asian cityscape, as well as reshaping of the bodies that locate themselves within it.

In the cinema our body falls away once the architecture is engaged, and we find ourselves found again when the light of the projector is extinguished and the auditorium reveals itself. The tension between a recognition and resistance of the body permeates Promotesh Das Pulak’s Echoed Moments in Time, a photo series that anchors Monitor 8 through first appearing on the poster you hold, and again when projected as digital slides in the cinema between each of the films and videos in the screening. In Echoed Moments in Time the artist appropriates archival photographs of the 1971 Bangladesh Liberation War, inserting his contemporary presence into the visual history by meticulously digitally placing his own face onto the multiple bodies captured in the single image. Here he stands collectively alone.

Before we turn to our body, let us begin with the basics, of objects in space before they transition from an individual to a collective role. A cursory scan of a room reveals the prepatory materiality of various extant objects on their way to becoming – assemblages in states of being and undoing. The roomtone of the space you inhabit right now is folded into that of another space in a different time in Kitsum Cheung’s Delta: My Lovely Tidings, A. We move through a field where meaning accrues mysteriously and the accumulated objects interact according to the scale of the artist’s making.

Questions of scale are posed throughout Ekta Mittal and Yashaswini Raghunandan’s In_Transience, tracing corporate and state resources in the service of continuously re-defining the landscape of Bangalore. Mittal and Raghunandan do not limit the auto-ethnography of In_Transience to the material, but specifically take in the immaterial, through interviews with workers who directly relay their encounters with the ghosts of the unfinished urban landscape – spirits that shift uncomfortably between the undefined borders of workplace and workcamp, sites that like the spirits, are subject to change.

The frame of the built environment falls away as the ephemeral moment unfolds in Tahrieh Lal’s Silence Elsewhere. Her video offers the languid view of the landscape filled by a frame within a frame, distorting and reflecting what lies both before and beyond outside.

The title of Panchal Mansaram’s film Rear-View Mirror refers first and foremost to the quote attributed to Marshall McLuhan: “We look at the present through a rear-view mirror. We march backwards into the future.” The environment in the film Mansaram initially shot in 1971 are reflected back twofold, first as an Indian artist who migrated to Canada looking back at his nation of origin and second as a historical document to which the artist has recently returned, re-editing the film via video.

A return of the artist to a historical body continues in Isolation of Pectoralis Major (Version 2) by Sukanya Ghosh. Here, an assembly of images reminiscent of the early motion studies by Eadward Muybridge and Etienne-Jules Marey is but one layer of an evolving collage.

Jan Villa chronicles an architecture of remembrance when Natasha Mendonca returns to her home city of Mumbai after the floods of 2005. The improvisary mode of diaristic filmmaking deployed by Mendonca draws upon the gesture of her hand in framing and following an image – one that always remains adjacent.

A kind of collaboration between Ashiq Khondker and the collective Gelitin, Blind Film was the product of a process – namely Gelitin’s 2010 exhibition Blind Sculpture at Greene Naftali in New York. With the members of the collective blindfolded and assisted in their sculpture making by those whose vision remained unimpaired, Khondker’s film which was also made sight unseen pulls one layer of the palimpsest away from the project.

In Tal Amiran’s Facades the hard edges and soft material of scale model architecture manufactured to be seen at a remove forms a landscape of ellipses. While the camera does aurally register the texture of the studio, it is no longer roomtone that fills the space between us and the environment, but the refraction of light, as flashbulbs burst and the image suddenly becomes closer.

Like the cinema, let’s exit by the way we entered. Returning to Leaving the Movie Theatre Roland Barthes asks: “What does the ‘darkness’ of the cinema mean?” He answers: “In this darkness of the cinema…lies the very fascination of the film (any film).” He speaks of being fascinated twice over, by the image and by its surroundings – the body and the building.

Jacob Korczynski is an independent curator who recently participated in the de Appel Curatorial Programme in Amsterdam. He is currently the Assistant Curator at the Art Gallery of York University in Toronto.



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